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Mill(s) Identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

Laverstock (Farm) Water Mill, Stoke Abbott, Dorset

Laverstock Farm House in Dorset is the focus of an isolated estate situated about three miles south west of Stoke Abbott. It falls within that parish for the purposes of record-keeping. In 1858 Stock Abbott was the scene of the last public hanging in Dorset. A cottage in the village caught fire. When the blaze was extinguished, the body of 23 year old Sarah Guppy was found among the embers with her throat cut. A relative, john Searle, was convicted of her murder and hanged on 10th August that year.

Harris, Duncan

Brimley Mill, Stoke Abbott

(1) Mill House and Water-Mill (Early 19th century).
(2) Rubble-stone walls.
(3) Slate roof.
(4) Brick stacks at: left hand gable, centre ridge, right hand gable.
(5) Stone gable-coping at right hand.
(6) 3 storey building.
(7) 5 windows, 3-light casements with lead lights.
(8) Wooden lintels and cills.
(9) One fixed window with glazing-bars replaces a door in that position.
(10) Lower, one storey, one bay range at right hand with 3-light casements.
(11) Slate roof with one brick stack at right hand.
(12) Doors: 2 approximately at centre, one with 2-lights; one with 6 lights.
(13) Blue lias steps moved left, to approach door beside water-wheel.
(14) Cast-iron wheel, built 1852 (Beaminster).
(15) Machinery mainly intact, and driving 2 mill-stones.

Harris, Duncan

Mill(s) Identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

Mill(s) Identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

Mill(s) Identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

Mill(s) identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

Mill(s) Identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

Mill(s) Identified in Domesday Book

The Domesday Book was a (taxation) survey of most of England and Wales, completed in 1086. Among other items, it listed the number of mills, with a total of over 6000 mentioned. These mills would have been watermills, or perhaps animal powered mills - the survey was completed before the introduction of windmills. Many places are listed as having a fractional number of mills, which presumably came about because the "mill" was shared, or somehow only taxable on part of it. It's likely that a mill referred to the machine, rather than the building itself - so a single building containing multiple sets of mill stones would have been recorded as several mills.

Harris, Duncan

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